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VP9 | QuickiWiki

VP9

  EN

Overview

VP9
Developed by Google
Initial release December 13, 2012
Type of format Compressed video
Contained by WebM, Matroska
Extended from VP8
Open format? Yes


libvpx (VP9 codec library)[1][2]
Developer(s) Google
Development status Active
Written in C
Operating system Unix-like (including GNU/Linux, FreeBSD and Mac OS X), Windows
Type Video codec
License New BSD license
Website webmproject.org


VP9 logo - VP9
VP9 logo
For other uses, see VP9 (disambiguation).

VP9 is an open and royalty free[3] video coding format being developed by Google. VP9 had earlier development names of Next Gen Open Video (NGOV) and VP-Next. VP9 is a successor to VP8. Chromium, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera support playing VP9 video format in the HTML5 video tag.

TimelineBETA

Thanks 2013
June 11: Profile 0 of VP9 was finalized.
Thanks  
August 20: Google released Chrome 29 with VP9 final support.
Thanks  
October 3: A native VP9 decoder was added to FFmpeg, and on November 15, 2013, to Libav.
Thanks 2014
January 7: Ittiam demonstrated its VP9 decoder on ARM Cortex devices.
Thanks  
March 18: Mozilla added VP9 support to Firefox in version 28.
Thanks  
September 12: Google announced that development on VP10 had begun and that after the release of VP10 they plan to have an 18-month gap between releases of video formats.
Thanks 2015
January 5: Nvidia officially announced the Tegra X1 SoC with full fixed-function VP9 hardware decoding.
Thanks  
March 2: VeriSilicon announced the Hantro G2v2 decoder IP which supports VP9 Profile 2.
Thanks  
April 3: Google released libvpx 1.4.0 which adds support for 10-bit and 12-bit bit depth, 4:2:2 and 4:4:4 chroma subsampling, and VP9 multithreaded decoding/encoding.
Thanks  
August: Google began to publish code for VP10.

Videos

History

Development of VP9 started in Q3 2011.[4][5] One of the goals for VP9 is to reduce the bit rate by 50% compared to VP8 while having the same video quality.[6] Another goal for VP9 is to improve it to the point where it would have better compression efficiency than High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC).[5]

On June 11, 2013, profile 0 of VP9 was finalized.[7][8]

On August 20, 2013, Google released Chrome 29 with VP9 final support.

On October 3, 2013, a native VP9 decoder was added to FFmpeg,[9] and on November 15, 2013, to Libav.

On January 7, 2014, Ittiam demonstrated its VP9 decoder on ARM Cortex devices. The Ittiam VP9 Decoder, built in collaboration with ARM and Google, focuses on power, scale and portability with equal importance given to each. It runs at 1080p 30fps using the ARM Mali-T604 GPU on an Arndale board powered by Samsung’s Exynos 5 Dual SoC.[10][11]

On March 18, 2014, Mozilla added VP9 support to Firefox in version 28.[12][13]

On January 5, 2015, Nvidia officially announced the Tegra X1 SoC with full fixed-function VP9 hardware decoding. [14][15]

On March 2, 2015, VeriSilicon announced the Hantro G2v2 decoder IP which supports VP9 Profile 2.[16]

On April 3, 2015, Google released libvpx 1.4.0 which adds support for 10-bit and 12-bit bit depth, 4:2:2 and 4:4:4 chroma subsampling, and VP9 multithreaded decoding/encoding.[17]

Technical details

VP9 has many design improvements compared to VP8.[4][5] VP9 supports the use of superblocks[18] of 64x64 pixels.[4][5] A quadtree coding structure will be used with the superblocks.[4][5]

The VP9 format supports the following color spaces: Rec. 601, Rec. 709, Rec. 2020, SMPTE-170, SMPTE-240, and sRGB.[19][20]

Profiles

The VP9 format defines four profiles: profile 0, profile 1, profile 2, and profile 3.[7][21] Profile 0 allows for a bit depth of 8-bits per sample and supports 4:2:0 chroma subsampling.[7][21][22] Profile 1, which is optional for hardware, adds support for 4:2:2 chroma subsampling, 4:4:4 chroma subsampling, alpha channel support, and depth channel support.[7][21] Google later developed two high bit depth profiles: profile 2 and profile 3.[23][22][24] Profile 2 allows for a bit depth of 10-bits to 12-bits per sample and supports 4:2:0 chroma subsampling.[22] Profile 3 adds support for 4:2:2 chroma subsampling, 4:4:4 chroma subsampling, and alpha channel support.[22]

Adoption

VP10

"VP10" redirects here. For other uses, see VP10 (disambiguation).

On September 12, 2014, Google announced that development on VP10 had begun and that after the release of VP10 they plan to have an 18-month gap between releases of video formats.[28] In August 2015, Google began to publish code for VP10.[29]

See also

  • Daala – a video compression format being developed by the Xiph.Org Foundation

References

  1. ^ "VP9 Video Codec Summary". WebM Project (Google). Retrieved 2013-07-04. 
  2. ^ Lou Quillio (2013-07-01). "VP9 Lands in Chrome Dev Channel". WebM Project (Google). Retrieved 2013-07-04. 
  3. ^ http://gigaom.com/2014/01/02/youtube-4k-streaming-vp9/
  4. ^ a b c d "VP-Next Overview and Progress Update" (PDF). WebM Project (Google). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Adrian Grange. "Overview of VP-Next" (PDF). Internet Engineering Task Force. Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  6. ^ "Next Gen Open Video (NGOV) Requirements" (PDF). WebM Project (Google). Retrieved 2012-12-29. 
  7. ^ a b c d Paul Wilkins (2013-05-08). "VP9 Bitstream finalization update". WebM Project (Google). Retrieved 2013-05-17. 
  8. ^ "VP9 profile 0 release candidate". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2013-06-11. Retrieved 2013-06-19. 
  9. ^ "Native VP9 decoder is now in the Git master branch". Launchpad. 2013-10-03. Retrieved 2013-12-08. 
  10. ^ "Ittiam and ARM are the first to efficiently bring Google’s VP9 to mobile devices". ARM Community. 2014-01-07. Retrieved 2013-07-04. 
  11. ^ "Ittiam's H.265 and VP9 Solutions to Have Widespread Coverage at CES 2014". ARM Community. 2014-01-07. Retrieved 2013-07-04. 
  12. ^ https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=833023
  13. ^ https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/28.0/releasenotes/
  14. ^ http://www.nvidia.com/object/tegra-x1-processor.html
  15. ^ http://www.anandtech.com/show/8811/nvidia-tegra-x1-preview
  16. ^ "VeriSilicon Introduces Hantro G2v2 Multi-format Decoder IP with VP9 Profile 2 to Support 10-bit Premium Internet Content". Business Wire. 2015-03-02. Retrieved 2015-03-02. 
  17. ^ Michael Larabel (2015-04-03). "libvpx 1.4.0 Brings Faster VP9 Encode/Decode". Phoronix. Retrieved 2015-04-03. 
  18. ^ pieter3d (October 18, 2013). "How VP9 works, technical details & diagrams". forum.doom9.org. Retrieved 31 March 2014. 
  19. ^ "Add slightly more colorspace variations". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2013-06-07. Retrieved 2013-06-19. 
  20. ^ "Change the use of a reserved color space entry". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2014-11-06. Retrieved 2014-11-07. 
  21. ^ a b c "Merge "Add bits for colorspace, profile" into experimental". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2013-06-07. Retrieved 2013-06-19. 
  22. ^ a b c d "Reworks high-bit-depth profiles". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2014-06-10. Retrieved 2014-06-28. 
  23. ^ "Update on WebM/VP9". Google Developers. 2014-06-25. Retrieved 2014-06-28. 
  24. ^ "Remove experimental-bitstream flag for profiles>0". Chromium (web browser) (Google). 2014-10-03. Retrieved 2015-03-02. 
  25. ^ "YouTube now uses VP9 as standard (for popular videos)". 29 May 2014. Retrieved 19 February 2015. 
  26. ^ "YouTube goes 4K and VP9 at CES". slashdot.org. 2014-01-03. Retrieved 2014-02-16. 
  27. ^ Monty Montgomery http://xiphmont.livejournal.com/67752.html. Retrieved 2015-09-02.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  28. ^ Stephen Shankland (September 12, 2014). "Google's Web-video ambitions bump into hard reality". CNET. Retrieved September 13, 2014. 
  29. ^ Michael Larabel (Phoronix.com), 17. August 2015: Google Starts Pushing Out VP10 Open-Source Code Into Libvpx
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