.
Want Wikipedia to look like this?   
Click here to upgrade your Wikipedia experience
St. Sava's Serbian Orthodox Seminary | QuickiWiki

St. Sava's Serbian Orthodox Seminary

  EN

Overview

EastOrthodoxcross - St. Sava's Serbian Orthodox Seminary
EastOrthodoxcross

St. Sava Serbian Orthodox School of Theology (Libertyville, Illinois) is the professional theological school in the Serbian Orthodox Church in the USA and Canada. The school is located in Libertyville, Illinois, USA, collocated with the St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Monastery.

St Sava provides a four-year theological education for the priestly and religious education vocations in a program that grants a Bachelor's degree upon graduation. The classes are open to both male and female students. Classes are taught in both English and Serbian. The student body of St. Sava school is currently 23 (2006). The school possesses a library of 8,000 titles.

History

The monastery was founded in 1923 by Montenegrin Bishop Mardary as a school for the Serbian Orthodox Church.[1]

Dionisije Milivojević was appointed bishop of the American-Canadian Diocese in 1939. During World War II, the Libertyville monastery became an American refuge for Orthodox Serbs. In 1964, Patriarch German of Serbia defrocked American Bishop Dionisije Milivojević over political and administrative issues. This forced a split between the Serbian and North American branches of the church. The result was two separate North American churches--the Serbian Orthodox Church in the USA and Canada in Libertyville and the Diocese of New Gracanica – Midwestern America in nearby Third Lake. The Illinois Supreme Court deemed that this schism was a violation of the mother church's regulations and forbade recognition of Bishop Dionisije. However, in 1976, the United States Supreme Court ruled that this was in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in Serbian Orthodox Diocese v. Milivojevich.[2]

Peter II of Yugoslavia, the last Serbian king, lived at the monastery after being exiled by Josip Broz Tito. He died at the church in 1970 and his will stipulated that he wished to be buried there. More than 10,000 attended his funeral. He lay there until his remains were repatriated to Serbia in 2013.[3][4]

The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

References

Graveyards of Chicago: The People, History, Art, and Lore of Cook County Cemeteries
Matt Hucke:::Ursula Bielski (1999)
Charting the lore and lure of Chicago's ubiquitous burial grounds, this resource unearths the legends and legacies that mark the city's silent citizens—from larger-than-lifers and local heroes to machine mayors and machine-gunners. The book demonstrates that Chicago's cemeteries are home not only to thousands of individuals who fashioned the city's singular culture and character, but also to impressive displays of art and architecture, landscaping and limestone, egoism and ethnic pride. Mysterious questions such as Where is Al Capone buried? and What really lies beneath home plate at Wrigley Field? are answered in this reminder that although physical life must end, personal notes—and notoriety—last forever. Discover a Chicago That Exists Just Beneath the Surface—About Six Feet Under.Ever wonder where Al Capone is buried? How about Clarence Darrow? Muddy Waters? Harry Caray? Or maybe Brady Bunch patriarch Robert Reed? And what really lies beneath home plate at Wrigley Field? Graveyards of Chicago answers these and other cryptic questions as it charts the lore and lure of Chicagos ubiquitous burial grounds.Like the livelier neighborhoods that surround them, Chicagos cemeteries are often crowded, sometimes weary, ever-sophisticated, and full of secrets. They are home not only to thousands of individuals who fashioned the citys singular culture and character,but also to impressive displays of art and architecture, landscaping and limestone, egoism and ethnic pride, and the constant reminder that although physical life must end for us all, personal note—and notoriety—last forever.Grab a shovel and tag along as Ursula Bielski, local historian and author of Chicago Haunts, and Matt Hucke, photographer and creator of graveyards.com unearth the legends and legacies that mark Chicagos silent citizens—from larger-than-lifers and local heroes, to clerics and comedians, machine mayors and machine-gunners.This book contains 168 photos.
The History of Serbia
John K. Cox (2002)
With the outbreak of war in the former Yugoslavia in 1991, interest in Balkan history has increased and become emotionally charged. This balanced and engagingly written history of Serbia will help readers to understand the complex web of Serbian history, politics, society, and culture and how the Serbs have dealt with the many political, military, and socioeconomic challenges in their history. It attempts to remove the veil of stereotypes and myths obscuring the significant details and developmental processes in the history of Serbia and in its relations with its neighbors. In addition to examining the political history of Serbia in the context of Central Europe, the author, a specialist in Balkan history, shows how societal and cultural developments affected Serbian history and reflected political and economic events.A timeline of significant events in the history of Serbia and an introductory chapter on Serbia today are followed by 12 chronologically organized narrative chapters that tell the story of this land from the splendor of medieval Serbia to a new beginning after the downfall of Slobodan Milosevic. Four historical maps, brief biographies of key figures in Serbian history, a glossary of terms, and a bibliographic essay provide valuable resource material for readers. Every library should update its collection of materials on Serbia with this current history.
  1. ^ Hucke, Matt; Bielski, Ursula (1999). Graveyards of Chicago. Chicago, IL: Lake Claremont Press. p. 202. ISBN 0964242648. 
  2. ^ Cox, John K. (2002). The History of Serbia. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 117. ISBN 0313312907. 
  3. ^ Tarm, Michael (4 March 2007). "King's body in U.S. may head to homeland". The Boston Globe (boston.com). Associated Press. Retrieved 23 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "HM King Peter II Returns Home after 72 Years". Balkans.com Business News (Balkans.com). 20 January 2013. Retrieved 23 January 2013. 

Source

This article incorporates text from St. Sava's Serbian Orthodox Seminary (Libertyville, Illinois) at OrthodoxWiki which is licensed under the CC-BY-SA and GFDL.
This page is based on data from Wikipedia (read/edit), Freebase, Amazon and YouTube under respective licenses.
Text is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.